The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior: Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage

yvjj_coverWolff, Kevin T., Michael T. Baglivio, Alex R. Piquero, Michael G. Vaughn, Matt DeLisi (forthcoming 2016). The Triple Crown of Antisocial Behavior: Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Community Disadvantage. Youth Violence & Juvenile Justice, published online before print, August 11, 2015.

This study examines the effect of negative emotionality, effortful control,  and community disadvantage on juvenile recidivism. Using DeLisi and Vaughn’s temperament theory as a foundation, we assess whether youth who have temperament issues and those who live in disadvantaged communities are more likely to recidivate. Findings indicate that net of a wide array of known risk factors, youth with poor temperaments, and those living in disadvantaged communities are more likely to reoffend. Additionally, those youth who face a triple threat of temperament issues and disadvantage reoffend faster post-completion. The theoretical and policy implications of these findings are discussed.