Cure Violence: A Public Health Model to Reduce Gun Violence

Butts, Jeffrey A., Caterina Gouvis Roman, Lindsay Bostwick, and Jeremy Porter (2015). Cure Violence: A Public Health Model to Reduce Gun Violence. Annual Review of Public Health, 2015 (36): 39–53. Scholars and practitioners alike in recent years have suggested that real and lasting progress in the fight against gun violence requires changing the social norms and attitudes that perpetuate violence and the use of guns. The Cure Violence model is a public health approach to gun violence reduction that seeks to change individual and community attitudes and norms about gun violence. It considers gun violence to be analogous to a…

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Criminal History and Landlord Rental Decisions: A New York Quasi-experimental Study

Evans, Douglas N. and Jeremy R. Porter (2014). Criminal History and Landlord Rental Decisions: A New York Quasi-experimental Study. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 11(1): 21-42. To determine the effect of a criminal conviction on landlord decisions to consider prospective tenants and the extent to which landlord responses vary based on a prospective tenant’s offense type, researchers used a quasi-experimental audit design involving matched pairs of “testers” posing as prospective tenants who called landlords across New York State to inquire about the possibility of renting a residence. Criminal conviction type was manipulated among equally eligible testers posing as non-offenders (control group)…

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Denormalizing Violence

Cure Violence utilizes a public health approach. It considers gun violence to be analogous to a communicable disease that passes from person to person when left untreated. According to the logic of Cure Violence, gun violence is most effectively reduced by changing the behavior of individuals at risk to participate in gun violence and “denormalizing” violence by working to change the community norms that support and perpetuate gun violence.

What do we Know About NYC’s Stop and Frisk Program? A Spatial and Statistical Analysis.

Evans, Douglas N., Cynthia-Lee Maragh and Jeremy R. Porter (2014). What do we Know About NYC’s Stop and Frisk Program? A Spatial and Statistical Analysis. Advances in Social Sciences Research Journal, 1(2): 129-144. Race appears to affect police decision making in stop-and-frisk situations, but the effect may be mediated by social-class variables. The study shows racial clustering in geographic patterns of NYPD stop-and-frisk actions, but race effects are mediated by the prevalence of new immigrants and owner-occupied housing in neighborhoods. Published Abstract Since its inception, New York City’s stop-and-frisk program has been controversial. The policy allows police officers to stop, question,…

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