Neighbors at Risk

Shooting incidents reported in each New York City census block group were divided over the population to create yearly rates of shooting incidents. Researchers then ranked all CBGs based on their rates of shooting incidents and identified the 50 CBGs with the highest rates in each year from 2015 to 2021.

Shooting Surge Continuing to Slow Across New York City

Shooting trends in New York City remain a serious concern, but recent quarter-specific, one-year differences declined for three straight quarters from October 2020 through June 2021.

Reducing Gun Violence in New York City

Causal relationships are difficult to identify in complex and multi-part initiatives, but New York City’s falling rate of gun violence suggests that recent community initiatives may have helped to sustain previous gains.

Who Pays for Gun Violence? You Do.

Gun violence affects far more people than those wounded directly. Victims’ families suffer mental, emotional, and financial costs as well. The cost of gun violence extends beyond the immediate medical consequences and the public pays.

Older Adults Responsible for Total Growth in Drug Arrests

The entire increase in drug crime arrests during the past decade was due to growing numbers of arrests involving adults ages 25 and older. Youth under age 18 and even young adults under age 25 were far less likely to be arrested for drug crimes in 2018 than any time in the past two decades.

Youth Still Leading Violent Crime Drop: 1988-2018

Based on the latest statistics compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the national violent crime arrest rate declined 38 percent overall between 1988 and 2018, but the steepest declines were observed among youth ages 10 to 14 (–53%) and 15 to 17 (–54%). The arrest rate for 18-20 year-olds dropped 47 percent while the arrest rates for adults ages 21-24 and 25-49 declined 42 percent and 23 percent, respectively.

Mixed News About Youth Violence in Recent FBI Crime Data

The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting series tracks violent crime trends using the four offenses of murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. According to the FBI, youth arrests for these offenses grew one percent between 2016 and 2017.

Gun Violence is not an “Urban” Problem

by Jeffrey A. Butts JohnJayREC DataBits 2018-01 (revised Jan 2020) Policy debates about gun violence focus on cities. Every year, when federal law enforcement authorities release the latest compilation of U.S. violent crime statistics, news media across the country publish stories ranking cities on the severity of violence, with some labeled as “America’s deadliest cities.” [...]

Los efectos de Cure Violence en los barrios South Bronx e East New York, Brooklyn

La ciudad de Nueva York lanzó el primer programa de Cure Violence - que utiliza el acercamiento a las comunidades para interrumpir la violencia - en 2010 con fondos del Departamento de Justicia de Estados Unidos. Hoy, hay 18 programas en toda la ciudad. Este informe analiza dos de ellos: Man Up! Inc. en el barrio East New York, Brooklyn y Save Our Streets en el barrio South Bronx. Cada uno de estos barrios fue comparado con otro barrio de características demográficas y tendencias criminales similares, pero sin programas de Cure Violence. Tal y como se detalla en este informe, las comparativas ofrecen una evidencia prometedora de que la perspectiva de salud pública para la reducción de la violencia, liderada por Cure Violence, puede ser capaz de crear comunidades sanas y seguras.

Juveniles Lead Adults in Declining Rate of Drug Crime

Based on statistics compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) within the U.S. Department of Justice, the national decline in arrests for drug offenses since the 1990s was more prolonged among juveniles than it was among adults age 18 and older.

Young Men in Neighborhoods with Cure Violence Programs Adopt Attitudes Less Supportive of Violence

New York City neighborhoods operating Cure Violence programs show stronger declines in violence-endorsing attitudes than do areas without Cure Violence programs.

Racial Disparities Persist in Juvenile Court Placements

According to data compiled by the National Center for Juvenile Justice and disseminated by the federal Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), the court processing of juvenile delinquency cases has reflected persistent racial disparities since the 1980s.

Perceptions of Violence in Morrisania (The Bronx)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Laila Alsabahi Research & Evaluation Center August 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various New York City neighborhoods. [...]

Perceptions of Violence in Bedford-Stuyvesant (Brooklyn)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Laila Alsabahi August 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various New York City neighborhoods. The survey relies on [...]

Perceptions of Violence in East New York (Brooklyn)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Marissa Mandala Research & Evaluation Center June 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various neighborhoods implementing the Cure [...]

Perceptions of Violence in the South Bronx

This study’s main goal was to measure changes in violent norms and attitudes in specific areas of New York City. The survey measured each respondent’s willingness to use violence in 17 hypothetical confrontation scenarios that ranged from minor to severe provocations. An index (or a composite score) was created from all 17 scenarios.

Racial Disparities in Juvenile Drug Arrests

by Jeffrey A. Butts June 1, 2015 The enforcement of U.S. drug laws during the 1980s and 1990s had disparate impacts on black youth despite the fact that illegal drug use in the U.S. does not differ significantly by race (SAMHSA 2014). Even adolescent involvement in drug sales does not vary significantly by race. Studies [...]

New York’s “Close to Home” Initiative — Lessons Learned

by Jeffrey A. Butts March 16, 2015 New York’s Close to Home initiative (C2H) is a policy reform that brings young offenders home from far-away correctional institutions to be served by programs closer to their families. New York implemented the first phase of C2H in 2012 for youth from the State’s “non-secure” programs. A second [...]

New York’s “Close to Home” Initiative – Did it Work?

by Jeffrey A. Butts March 16, 2015 Close to Home (C2H) is an effort to localize the youth justice system in New York City by keeping young offenders near their neighborhoods and families rather than sending them away to facilities that are far from home. Phase 1 of the C2H initiative began in 2012. Phase [...]

Effectiveness of the Cure Violence Model in New York City

New research from the John Jay College Research & Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) suggests that the Cure Violence Strategy may be effective in reducing the incidence of homicide. Researchers at John Jay worked with analysts at the New York Police Department (NYPD) to assemble information about violence in New York City neighborhoods and to compare areas with and without Cure Violence programs.

Violent Youth Arrests Continue to Fall Nationwide

According to national arrest estimates calculated with data released by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), law enforcement agencies across the United States made about 53,000 violent crime arrests involving youth under age 18 in 2013, compared with more than 60,000 in 2012.