Reducing Gun Violence in New York City

Causal relationships are difficult to identify in complex and multi-part initiatives, but New York City’s falling rate of gun violence suggests that recent community initiatives may have helped to sustain previous gains.

Reported Crime in MAP Communities Compared with Other NYC Areas

A rigorous test of the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety indicates that New York City’s effort to improve the safety of public housing communities was beginning to show benefits by the end of 2019 and could be considered a promising intervention.

Opinions and Perceptions of Residents in New York City Public Housing

As part of an evaluation of the New York City Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP), researchers from John Jay College of Criminal Justice collaborated with survey specialists from NORC at the University Chicago to collect data from two probability samples of residents in public housing developments in New York City. One sample of residents came from communities involved in the MAP initiative. A second sample was from statistically matched housing developments not involved in MAP.

Public Safety Trends in MAP Communities and Matched Comparison Areas

Was the presence of the MAP initiative in some NYCHA developments associated with greater improvements in crime and victimization outcomes compared with the same outcomes in NYCHA developments not involved in MAP? The results presented here do not answer the question in full, but they offer an early look at efforts by the research team to generate more precise answers. Additional analyses are needed to rule out competing explanations and to examine the complex series of relationships among all the study’s variables. Based on the preliminary findings in this report, however, the results of MAP to date may be considered promising.

Quasi-Experimental Comparison Design for Evaluating the Mayor’s Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety

To evaluate the New York City Mayor's Action Plan for Neighborhood Safety (MAP), an initiative to improve the safety of public housing developments, researchers estimated the counterfactual (no intervention) by selecting a set of comparison housing developments not involved in the initiative. The study relied on the statistical method known as propensity score analysis (PSA) to select the comparison group.

The Effects of Cure Violence in the South Bronx and East New York, Brooklyn

Promising evidence that the public health approach to violence reduction championed by Cure Violence may be capable of creating safe and healthy communities.

Young Men in Neighborhoods with Cure Violence Programs Adopt Attitudes Less Supportive of Violence

New York City neighborhoods operating Cure Violence programs show stronger declines in violence-endorsing attitudes than do areas without Cure Violence programs.

Street by Street: Cross-Site Evaluation of the OJJDP Community-Based Violence Prevention Demonstration Program

While one of the strengths of OJJDP's CBVP model was its emphasis on adaptation to local context and needs, the variation across program sites posed serious challenges for the evaluation and made it impossible to assess and compare outcomes in each city.

Surveillance without Protection

Policing anonymous and fearful undocumented migrant workers (UMWs) with equity, integrity and accountability is one of the toughest law enforcement challenges in the United States. The importance of the issue notwithstanding, police–UMW interactions remain a ‘black box’ in police research. We examined the political economy of Palisades Park, New Jersey, and interviewed 160 UMWs from the same town.

Perceptions of Violence in Morrisania (The Bronx)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Laila Alsabahi Research & Evaluation Center August 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various New York City neighborhoods. [...]

Perceptions of Violence in Bedford-Stuyvesant (Brooklyn)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Laila Alsabahi August 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various New York City neighborhoods. The survey relies on [...]

New York City Gun Violence: 2004-2014

Shootings per 1,000 population by Sheyla Delgado, Kevin Wolff, and Jeffrey Butts Research & Evaluation Center July 28, 2015 With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the New York City Council, the Research & Evaluation Center at John Jay College is conducting a program of studies known as NYC Cure. One study [...]

Perceptions of Violence in Harlem

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Marissa Mandala Research & Evaluation Center June 2015 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Funding support for this research brief was provided by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the New York City Council. The authors are grateful for the cooperation and support of the hundreds of New York City residents who [...]

Perceptions of Violence in East New York (Brooklyn)

by Sheyla A. Delgado, Jeffrey A. Butts, and Marissa Mandala Research & Evaluation Center June 2015 The Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice is assessing New York City’s violence reduction efforts. One element in the project involves in-person surveys with young men (ages 18-30) in various neighborhoods implementing the Cure [...]

Perceptions of Violence in the South Bronx

This study’s main goal was to measure changes in violent norms and attitudes in specific areas of New York City. The survey measured each respondent’s willingness to use violence in 17 hypothetical confrontation scenarios that ranged from minor to severe provocations. An index (or a composite score) was created from all 17 scenarios.

Perceptions of Violence: Surveying Young Males in New York City

In 2014, the JohnJayREC team began conducting surveys with residents in New York City neighborhoods where the Cure Violence program had been implemented for at least one year. Researchers surveyed samples of young male residents between the ages of 18 and 30, the demographic most at risk for violent offending and victimization. The survey instrument was designed to measure each respondent’s attitude towards violence, as well as other factors that could influence the endorsement of violent behavior.

Shooting Trends in New York City

New York City Census Tracts According to Trajectory of Shootings from 2004 to 2014 by Kevin Wolff, Sheyla Delgado and Evan Misshula Research & Evaluation Center February 2015 The accompanying map portrays New York City census tracts according to recent trends in gun violence. The Research & Evaluation Center calculated trend patterns based on the [...]

Effectiveness of the Cure Violence Model in New York City

New research from the John Jay College Research & Evaluation Center (JohnJayREC) suggests that the Cure Violence Strategy may be effective in reducing the incidence of homicide. Researchers at John Jay worked with analysts at the New York Police Department (NYPD) to assemble information about violence in New York City neighborhoods and to compare areas with and without Cure Violence programs.

Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Cure Violence Model in New York City

Butts, Jeffrey A. and Sheyla Delgado (2014). Evaluating the Effectiveness of the Cure Violence Model in New York City. New York, NY: Research & Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice. With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the City Council of New York City, the Research and Evaluation Center is [...]

YAP Assists Youth in Finding and Securing Employment

by Douglas Evans and Sheyla Delgado Research & Evaluation Center August 2014 Employment serves a number of positive functions in the lives of youth. Jobs promote hard work and time management, assist in the development of skills, offer job experience that can benefit future career options, and provide a source of income. Youth are at [...]

Youth Realize Educational Gains Following Their Participation in YAP

by Douglas Evans and Sheyla Delgado Research & Evaluation Center July 2014 Justice-involved youth are at high risk for failing or dropping out of school. Behavioral problems and difficulties at home increase their likelihood of suspension and expulsion. Mandated court appearances and out-of-home placements require youth to miss extended periods of school. Substance abuse, bullying, [...]

YAP Helps to Keep Youth Out of Secure Facilities

by Douglas Evans and Sheyla Delgago Research & Evaluation Center June 2014 Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (YAP) seeks to provide community-based alternatives for high-risk youth and reduce the juvenile justice system’s over-reliance on expensive and ineffective out-of-home placements. A mission of YAP is to keep youth in their homes so that advocates can utilize family [...]

YAP’s Approach to Wrap-Around Services Appears Intensive and Flexible

  Evans, Douglas and Sheyla Delgado (May 2014). YAP’s Approach to Wrap-around Services Appears Intensive and Flexible. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (YAP) provides advocacy services driven by strengths- and empowerment-based wrap-around best practices. Services and supports are targeted [...]

Most High Risk Youth Referred to YAP, Inc. Remain Arrest Free

Evans, Douglas and Sheyla Delgado (April 2014). Most High Risk Youth Referred to Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. Remain Arrest Free and in their Communities During YAP Participation. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Youth Advocate Programs, Inc. (YAP) has been committed to providing community-based [...]