Murders and Robberies in New York City: January-September 2015

Sheyla Delgado and Laila Alsabahi Research & Evaluation Center March 15, 2016 With funding from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the New York City Council, the Research & Evaluation Center at John Jay College is evaluating the Cure Violence model of violence reduction. The Cure Violence model is inspired by the public health approach to violence reduction. It is used in nearly two dozen neighborhoods throughout New York City. As part of that work, the Center obtained and mapped crime incident data disseminated by the New York City Police Department (NYPD). The map portrays criminal incidents reported to NYPD between…

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Violent Crime Rates in U.S. Cities with Populations over 500,000: 1985-2015

Data Source: Violent crimes reported to the Uniform Crime Reports program, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, as prepared by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Washington, DC (www.ucrdatatool.gov) for 1985-2012 as well as data obtained directly from FBI reports for 2013, 2014 and 2015 (preliminary 6-month 2015 figures weighted to represent 12 months). Note: Data presented for all large cities (over 500,000) that reported data nearly consistently to the FBI from 1985 through 2015. Cities omitted due to inconsistent reporting include Chicago, Charlotte-Mecklenburg (NC), and Honolulu.

Homicide Rates in U.S. Cities Over 500,000 Population

Data Source: Crimes reported to the Uniform Crime Reports program, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, as prepared by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Washington, DC (www.ucrdatatool.gov) for 1985-2012 and directly from the FBI for 2013. Note: Data presented for all large cities (over 500,000) that reported data nearly consistently to the FBI from 1985 through 2013. Cities omitted due to inconsistent reporting include Columbus (OH) and Honolulu (HI).   See: Cities ranked by percentage decline in violent crime rate Homicide numbers in each city over 500K Homicide…

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Violent Crime Rates in U.S. Cities Over 500,000 Total Population

Data Source: Crimes reported to the Uniform Crime Reports program, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, as prepared by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Washington, DC (www.ucrdatatool.gov) for 1985-2012 and directly from the FBI for 2013. Note: Data presented for all large cities (over 500,000) that reported data nearly consistently to the FBI from 1985 through 2013. Cities omitted due to inconsistent reporting include Chicago, Charlotte-Mecklenburg (NC), Detroit, Tucson, Fresno, Las Vegas, and Louisville.   See: Cities ranked by percentage decline in violent crime rate Homicide numbers in…

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Homicide Trends in U.S. Cities Over 500,000 Total Population

Data Source: Crimes reported to the Uniform Crime Reports program, Federal Bureau of Investigation, U.S. Department of Justice, as prepared by the National Archive of Criminal Justice Data and disseminated by the Bureau of Justice Statistics, Washington, DC (www.ucrdatatool.gov) for 1985-2012 and directly from the FBI for 2013. Note: Data presented for all large cities (over 500,000) that reported data nearly consistently to the FBI from 1985 through 2013. Cities omitted due to inconsistent reporting include Charlotte-Mecklenburg (NC), Columbus (OH), Tucson, Fresno, Las Vegas, and Louisville. See: Cities ranked by percentage decline in violent crime rate Homicide numbers in each…

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All You Need to Know About Crime Trends, in 60 Seconds

Every year, when the FBI releases the new crime data from the Uniform Crime Reports, we see media stories and policymakers commenting on the meaning of small, year-to-year changes. They should heed this video from Norway, which was designed to explain trends in climate change. It is just as relevant for understanding crime trends. Stop Watching the Dog Video credit: Animated short from the Norwegian program, “Siffer.” Animation by Ole Christoffer Haga.