Older Adults Responsible for Total Growth in Drug Arrests

The entire increase in drug crime arrests during the past decade was due to growing numbers of arrests involving adults ages 25 and older. Youth under age 18 and even young adults under age 25 were far less likely to be arrested for drug crimes in 2018 than any time in the past two decades. Continue reading Older Adults Responsible for Total Growth in Drug Arrests

Youth Still Leading Violent Crime Drop: 1988-2018

Based on the latest statistics compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the national violent crime arrest rate declined 38 percent overall between 1988 and 2018, but the steepest declines were observed among youth ages 10 to 14 (–53%) and 15 to 17 (–54%). The arrest rate for 18-20 year-olds dropped 47 percent while the arrest rates for adults ages 21-24 and 25-49 declined 42 percent and 23 percent, respectively. Continue reading Youth Still Leading Violent Crime Drop: 1988-2018

Mixed News About Youth Violence in Recent FBI Crime Data

The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting series tracks violent crime trends using the four offenses of murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. According to the FBI, youth arrests for these offenses grew one percent between 2016 and 2017. Continue reading Mixed News About Youth Violence in Recent FBI Crime Data

Crime Drop II – Young People are Leading the Newest Violent Crime Decline

  Butts, Jeffrey A. (2013). Crime Drop II – Young People are Leading the Newest Violent Crime Decline. Research and Evaluation Data Bits [2013-02]. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. During the 1980s and early 1990s, increasing numbers of arrests among juveniles and older youth were disproportionately responsible for the growing rate of violent crime. In … Continue reading Crime Drop II – Young People are Leading the Newest Violent Crime Decline

Violent Crime Rates Continue to Fall Among Juveniles and Young Adults

Butts, Jeffrey A. (2012). Violent Crime Rates Continue to Fall Among Juveniles and Young Adults. Research and Evaluation Data Bits [2012-06]. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Since the mid-1990s, violent crime rates fell among young juveniles (under age 15) and older adults (over age 24), but the scale of these changes was overwhelmed by … Continue reading Violent Crime Rates Continue to Fall Among Juveniles and Young Adults

Recent Increases in Drug Arrests Were for Possession, Not Sales

Butts, Jeffrey A. (2012). Recent Increases in Drug Arrests Were for Possession, Not Sales. Research and Evaluation Data Bits [2012-02]. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. The number of drug-related arrests reported by U.S. law enforcement agencies increased sharply between 1980 and 2010, with the largest growth occurring between 1991 and 2006. During … Continue reading Recent Increases in Drug Arrests Were for Possession, Not Sales

As Serious Juvenile Crime Declined, Police Made More Arrests for Less Serious Offenses

Butts, Jeffrey A. (2012). As Serious Juvenile Crime Declined, Police Made More Arrests for Less Serious Offenses. Research and Evaluation Data Bits [2012-01]. New York, NY: Research and Evaluation Center, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York. Between 1995 and 2010, juvenile arrests overall dropped nearly 40 percent. The level of violent crime arrests in 2010 was half the level of … Continue reading As Serious Juvenile Crime Declined, Police Made More Arrests for Less Serious Offenses

Trends in American Youth Crime

Jeffrey A. Butts and Daniel P. Mears (2011). Trends in American Youth Crime. In Juvenile Delinquency and Juvenile Justice, David W. Springer and Albert R. Roberts (Editors). Sudbury, MA: Jones and Bartlett Publishers, Inc. This chapter answers two deceptively simple questions, “How much juvenile crime is there today?” and “How does the level of juvenile crime today compare with juvenile crime 20 or 30 years ago?” The … Continue reading Trends in American Youth Crime