MSN — La Masacre de la Escuela de Texas fue el Tiroteo Número 203 de EEUU en Todo 2022

"Es una mezcla de racismo, resentimiento de clase, miedo al cambio, inexistente control de armas y políticos que quieren inflamar y explotar todo esto para mantenerse en el poder", explicó Jeffrey Butts, profesor del centro John Jay de Justicia Criminal de la Universidad de Nueva York.

Neighbors at Risk

Shooting incidents reported in each New York City census block group were divided over the population to create yearly rates of shooting incidents. Researchers then ranked all CBGs based on their rates of shooting incidents and identified the 50 CBGs with the highest rates in each year from 2015 to 2021.

Le Monde — La police de New York lancée aux trousses d’un tireur du métro de Brooklyn

Il est cependant rare d’assister dans les rues de la capitale économique et culturelle des EtatsUnis à une attaque impliquant en une fois autant de blessés par balle. « Je ne me souviens pas d’un précédent de ce type », note Jeffrey Butts, professeur au JohnJay College of Criminal Justice de l’université de New York. Pour lui, le Covid19 « n’est pas une cause directe » de la hausse de la criminalité dans la ville, « mais le virus a perturbé toutes les structures sociales – logement, emploi, scolarité – qui maintiennent habituellement les choses sous contrôle ».

NY1— Shootings Rise in Bronx, Fall in Brooklyn, as Anti-gun Efforts Start

As the city added more Cure Violence programs in pre-pandemic years, gun violence and deaths declined, said Sheyla Delgado, the deputy director of analytics at John Jay’s Research and Evaluation Center. “Can we say that is solely due to the appearance of these programs? Absolutely not,” Delgado said. “But they’re certainly a factor to consider.”

New York Magazine — The Risks of Overselling Violence Interruption

The key, we heard over and over again, is to have cops work in tandem with community-based “violence interrupters” — credible messengers from troubled communities who have the savvy and connections to quietly intervene at critical moments and persuade gang members, dope dealers, and other weapon-carriers not to resort to violence.

Nueva York, ¿Laboratorio para Frenar la Violencia Armada?

Con crecientes índices de criminalidad tanto en Nueva York como en el resto de Estados Unidos, el presidente Joe Biden se reúne este jueves, en la ciudad de los rascacielos, con el alcalde Eric Adams para hablar de la inseguridad que generan las armas de fuego, un asunto sensible para el Partido Demócrata.

The Trace — There Are Only Two City-Funded Violence Prevention Sites Tackling Surging Violence in Upper Manhattan

Studies conducted of two CMS sites by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice’s Research and Evaluation Center found that, in addition to a decline in shootings over two years, trust in law enforcement increased, and fewer people turned to violence. "Over time, attitudes did change, especially in the Cure Violence neighborhoods,” said Sheyla Delgado, a researcher at John Jay who has coauthored several CMS studies.

The Trace — Can Eric Adams Square His Pro-Police Image With Support For Community-Led Solutions to Violence?

Proponents say that the number of shootings they prevented is difficult to track, and benefits like better community-police relations are hard to quantify. Despite that, a review by researchers at John Jay College of Criminal Justice found that average monthly shootings decreased 28 percent across CMS sites in the first two years of the effort.

Shooting Surge Continuing to Slow Across New York City

Shooting trends in New York City remain a serious concern, but recent quarter-specific, one-year differences declined for three straight quarters from October 2020 through June 2021.

Fox5 New York — Chinatown Assault Suspect was Arrested Last Week on Other Charges

Police often say the criminal justice system is a revolving door but Jeffrey Butts of John Jay College of Criminal Justice said his research proves otherwise. "The vast majority of people who are released pretrial do not get arrested again while they are waiting for trial," he said. "About 5%, at most, of people who are arrested and waiting trial and then released get rearrested prior to their trial."