NY Lawmakers Seek To Create A “Predictable Funding Stream” For Anti-Violence Programs

NY Lawmakers Seek To Create A “Predictable Funding Stream” For Anti-Violence Programs

Cure Violence programs in New York City have become a staple during the de Blasio administration over the years, receiving $34 million in allocations while expanding into 17 precincts in high-crime neighborhoods. A study by John Jay College of Criminal Justice in 2020 found that the drop in shootings over the years coincided with increased use of Cure Violence programs across the city.

Reducing Violence Without Police: A Review of Research Evidence

Reducing Violence Without Police:  A Review of Research Evidence

Arnold Ventures asked the Research and Evaluation Center at John Jay College of Criminal Justice to review and summarize the research evidence for policies and programs that reduce community violence without relying on police.

Reducing Gun Violence in New York City

Reducing Gun Violence in New York City

Causal relationships are difficult to identify in complex and multi-part initiatives, but New York City’s falling rate of gun violence suggests that recent community initiatives may have helped to sustain previous gains.

The Bumpy Road to Police Abolition

The Bumpy Road to Police Abolition

Those supportive of reform may be quick to reverse themselves out of fear of being cast as soft on crime, so new initiatives need to be protected with solid evidence. If a city wanted to radically reduce expenditures on policing, Butts said, “I would totally back it, but I would be terrified we would squander all the good energy by not being fully prepared.”

Who Pays for Gun Violence? You Do.

Who Pays for Gun Violence?   You Do.

Gun violence affects far more people than those wounded directly. Victims’ families suffer mental, emotional, and financial costs as well. The cost of gun violence extends beyond the immediate medical consequences and the public pays.