Youth Still Leading Violent Crime Drop: 1988-2018

Youth Still Leading Violent Crime Drop: 1988-2018

Based on the latest statistics compiled by the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the national violent crime arrest rate declined 38 percent overall between 1988 and 2018, but the steepest declines were observed among youth ages 10 to 14 (–53%) and 15 to 17 (–54%). The arrest rate for 18-20 year-olds dropped 47 percent while the arrest rates for adults ages 21-24 and 25-49 declined 42 percent and 23 percent, respectively.

Mixed News About Youth Violence in Recent FBI Crime Data

Mixed News About Youth Violence in Recent FBI Crime Data

The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting series tracks violent crime trends using the four offenses of murder, rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. According to the FBI, youth arrests for these offenses grew one percent between 2016 and 2017.

It’s Not About the Art; It’s About the Artist

It’s Not About the Art; It’s About the Artist

We actually need young people who are bold, willing to challenge conventional thinking, and to break rules, but we also need them to respect others, to rely on logic rather than force, and to appreciate the corrosive effects of violence and exploitation. In short, our communities need powerful and creative young people who want to improve us and not simply to fight us. These should seem like obvious concepts to anyone working around the youth justice system, but it is often surprisingly difficult to implement them in practice.

Positive Outcomes

Positive Outcomes

This report reviews a number of prominent frameworks that are available to help youth justice systems rely on positive outcomes rather than recidivism to measure their effectiveness. These include the Developmental Assets model, the 5Cs model, the Youth Program Quality Assessment model, the Positive Youth Justice model, and the Youth Thrive framework. Each model or framework aligns with the key principles of positive youth development as well as the large body of research on desistance from crime, which is also presented in this report.

Senselessly Slain Teens Leave Behind Reminders of Cruel Fate Faced Daily in New York City Streets

Senselessly Slain Teens Leave Behind Reminders of Cruel Fate Faced Daily in New York City Streets

by ADAM SHRIER NEW YORK DAILY NEWS January 2, 2018 For Rohan Levy, the line between life and death came down to a teenage gunman who mistook the 15-year-old boy’s friend for a rival gang member. The charismatic Brooklyn teen, with his bright smile and exuberant laugh, was joking with two friends just a half [...]

Florida Juvenile Justice said it Would Weed out Bad Hires. How Did This Guy Slip Through?

Florida Juvenile Justice said it Would Weed out Bad Hires. How Did This Guy Slip Through?

IT’S LORD OF THE FLIES CULTURE WITH SOME OF THE PEOPLE THEY HAVE MANAGING THESE FACILITIES.WITH STRONG KIDS CONTROLLING THE WEAK KIDS — AND THE STAFF CONTROLLING THE STRONG KIDS. Jeffrey Butts, director of the Research and Evaluation Center at the John Jay College of Criminal Justice

The Mobility of Youth in the Justice System: Implications for Recidivism

The Mobility of Youth in the Justice System: Implications for Recidivism

Both residential mobility and community disadvantage have been shown to be associated with negative outcomes for adolescents generally and juvenile offenders specifically. The current study examines the effects of moving among a large sample (n = 13,096) of previously adjudicated youth (31.6 % female, 41.2 % Black, 16.5 % Hispanic). Additionally, we examine whether moving upward to a more affluent neighborhood, moving downward to an area of greater disadvantage, or moving laterally to a similar neighborhood tempers the effects of residential mobility. We use a combination of analytical techniques, including propensity score matching to untangle the effects of mobility sans pre-existing conditions between movers and non-movers. Results show relocation increases recidivism, irrespective of the direction of the move with regard to socioeconomic context. Moving upward has the most detrimental impact for adjudicated male adolescents, while downward relocations evidenced the largest effect for female youth. Implications for policy and future research needs are discussed.