The Mobility of Youth in the Justice System: Implications for Recidivism

Wolff, Kevin T., Michael T. Baglivio, Jonathan Intravia, Mark A. Greenwald, and Nathan Epps (2017). The Mobility of Youth in the Justice System: Implications for Recidivism. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 46(7): 1371–1393. Both residential mobility and community disadvantage have been shown to be associated with negative outcomes for adolescents generally and juvenile offenders specifically. The current study examines the effects of moving among a large sample (n = 13,096) of previously adjudicated youth (31.6 % female, 41.2 % Black, 16.5 % Hispanic). Additionally, we examine whether moving upward to a more affluent neighborhood, moving downward to an area of greater disadvantage, or moving laterally…

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Predicting Adverse Childhood Experiences

Effects of concentrated disadvantage and affluence on ACE scores are examined in a statewide sample of more than 59,000 juvenile offenders, controlling for salient individual (including family and parenting) measures and demographics. Both disadvantage and affluence affect ACE exposure. Implications for research and policy are discussed.

Adverse Childhood Experiences, Negative Emotionality, and Pathways to Juvenile Recidivism

Prior work has illustrated youth exposed to adverse parenting practices are more likely to offend and juvenile offenders with maltreatment histories more likely to re-offend. In addition, aggressive tendencies and a hostile interpretation of the actions of others and one’s environment increase antisocial behavior.

Do Social Bonds Buffer the Impact of Adverse Childhood Experiences on Reoffending?

Research from multiple disciplines has reported that exposure to childhood traumatic events, often referred to as adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), increases an individual’s chances of experiencing a wide variety of negative consequences such as chronic disease, unemployment, and involvement in serious, violent, and chronic offending.

The Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Recidivism

Results from a series of Cox hazard models suggest that ACEs increase the risk of subsequent arrest, with a higher prevalence of ACEs leading to a shorter time to recidivism. The relationship between ACEs and recidivism held quite well in demographic-specific analyses.

Effortful Control, Negative Emotionality, and Juvenile Recidivism

Recently, DeLisi and Vaughn articulated a temperament-based theory of antisocial behavior which they expressed as the first within criminology to use temperament explicitly, and as the exclusive explanatory construct of both antisocial behavior and negative interactions with the criminal justice system.