Stop, Question, and Frisk in New York City: A Study of Public Opinions

New York City’s Stop-and-Frisk program has been a contentious police practice for more than 40 years. There is extensive research that examines attitudes toward the police; however, empirical research has yet to analyze citizens’ perceptions of stop-and-frisk.

Coping with Stigma: How Registered Sex Offenders Manage their Public Identities

Evans, Douglas N. and Michelle A. Cubellis (2015). Coping with Stigma: How Registered Sex Offenders Manage their Public Identities. American Journal of Criminal Justice, 40(3): 593-619. The purpose of this paper is to explore the ways in which registered sex offenders (RSOs) cope with stigmatization and manage their identities when they are subjected to or anticipate social condemnation. In-depth interviews were conducted with 20 RSOs. Respondents discussed methods they use to cope with and manage their stigmatized identities, including honesty, concealment, and isolation, which are addressed in prior literature on stigma management. Additional coping strategies were discussed: grouping, in which…

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An Exploration of Stigma in the Lives of Sex Offenders and Heroin Abusers

Furst, R. Terry and Douglas N. Evans (2014). An Exploration of Stigma in the Lives of Sex Offenders and Heroin Abusers. Deviant Behavior. Published online October 2014 (00:1–16). Research was conducted on variations and commonalities of sexual offenders and heroin abusers and how they manage stigma in their everyday lives. Interviews with 13 sex offenders (SOs) and 44 heroin abusers (HAs) were conducted in New York City. Results suggest that both SOs and HAs disclose or conceal their stigmatized status based on their relationship to others and the situations in which they anticipate social condemnation. Both groups have formed intra-group…

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Criminal History and Landlord Rental Decisions: A New York Quasi-experimental Study

Evans, Douglas N. and Jeremy R. Porter (2014). Criminal History and Landlord Rental Decisions: A New York Quasi-experimental Study. Journal of Experimental Criminology, 11(1): 21-42. To determine the effect of a criminal conviction on landlord decisions to consider prospective tenants and the extent to which landlord responses vary based on a prospective tenant’s offense type, researchers used a quasi-experimental audit design involving matched pairs of “testers” posing as prospective tenants who called landlords across New York State to inquire about the possibility of renting a residence. Criminal conviction type was manipulated among equally eligible testers posing as non-offenders (control group)…

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The Debt Penalty

Depending on the jurisdiction, offenders are charged fees at nearly every phase of the criminal justice process. In addition to fines, interest, and penalties for late payments, offenders may be required to pay “user fees,” which differ from court-imposed fines. The sole purpose of user fees is to raise revenue for criminal justice systems, while court-imposed fines are intended to punish offenders or to provide financial compensation to victims.